[The Story When] Three Roses From Heaven (A Love Story)

Was it divine intervention? A rom com? Regina Layug Rosero shares the story of how Lola met Lolo.

The rom-com version of this story would be that Chita met Ermy, and they fell in love and lived happily ever after. But Chita didn’t want to marry Ermy, however persistently he courted her.

I could only imagine how confused she was. Here was a pleasant young man, a handsome mestizo, her best friend’s brother no less, and he wanted to marry her. But she wanted to devote her life to the Lord. What was a young woman of the 1950s supposed to do?

Read the full story here. Published May 2015.

[The Story When] Snapshots from the Seventies

“This is Dad crossing Roxas Boulevard.” Image from The Story When.

Paul Catiang explores family history for The Story When.

I was around four or five when Mommy first told me about Dad. She said that they couldn’t marry because he was already betrothed to someone else from birth, as is the custom among upper-class Indians. The exchange and merging of property was supposedly a done deal—there might have been some resort island involved, as a dowry. In the years that followed, the mental images that came to mind involved a mix of Bedouin tents, elephants, peacocks, turbans, all manner of exotic clichés my young imagination cobbled together from the Arabian Nights and the World Book Encyclopedia’s volume on entries under the letter I.

Read the full story here. Published May 2015.

[GMA News Online] The Philippines and the Pacific world: Past connections, modern ties

Image from GMA News Online
Image from GMA News Online

Regina Layug Rosero explores the Philippines in a new neighborhood–the Pacific.

While many of our Asian neighbors eat with chopsticks and stage the Ramayana on a regular basis, we use forks and spoons, and few of us are familiar with the Indian epic. Many scholars and intellectuals have pointed out these and more differences between us and our Southeast Asian brothers and sisters.

But rather than focusing on this deficit of Asian character, Dr. [Fernando] Zialcita suggests we look at what we have in common with our other neighbors: those of the Pacific islands.

Our pre-Hispanic history tells of trade with neighboring islands, of extensive travel and exploration aboard outriggers with v-shaped sails, of a diet rich in taro and coconut. A glance at Micronesian culture will show you the same things, as well as many other commonalities.

Read the full article here.